What is the process of falling asleep like?

Q:  Please describe what the process of falling asleep is like for a normal person.  I’m having trouble lately.  It’s almost like I’ve forgotten how to fall asleep.

A:  Great question.  There are some consistencies, but it’s also probably safe to say the process is very individual.  There is no absolute right or wrong way to do it, just what works for you.

The commonalities include progressive relaxation of the muscles of the body, and a decoupling of the mind from sensing and perceiving environmental stimuli.  The process is whole person, meaning mind and body working in concert together.  When it comes to sleep, the two are really inseparable.

Worth emphasizing falling asleep is a natural and autonomic process, like breathing, something we really don’t have to think about or try to force.

In fact trying to force sleep can and often does result in taking you in the opposite direction.  Instead of drowsiness, forcing can lead to arousal, including increased heart and respiration rates.

For those with chronic insomnia, the idea of relearning how to fall asleep has some merit.  A significant body of research has shown that intensive sleep retraining (ISR) works, and quickly.

With ISR, patients are hooked up to an electroencephalograph, which accurately determines when sleep onset occurs.  Individuals are immediately awakened after 3 consecutive minutes of any stage of sleep activity.  Over an extended period of time, sometimes 24 hours or more, this understandably builds up an acute level of sleep deprivation.  Even the most chronic insomniacs will generally experience dozens of sleep onsets in an extended session.  By repeatedly experiencing many sleep onsets in a compressed time frame, the recipient by association quickly relearns what the experience of falling asleep feels like.

The results show ISR rapidly improves the ability of insomniacs to fall asleep quickly and also helps increase total sleep time.

Most of us who won’t undergo a full ISR session and just want to sleep better can learn something valuable from this.  ISR suggests thinking back on what the experience was like last time you fell asleep quickly.  That is the good feeling to dwell on.  You don’t need to necessarily try to recreate that exact same routine or experience night after night; rather just let yourself go in the same way you did when you slept well.

Because that’s what falling asleep really is — a process of letting go.  When you find that place in your mind, and over time you will, stay with it and your sleep system will eventually grow stronger.

For more drug-free ways to help yourself sleep, check out the Sleep Training System.

 

Explore posts in the same categories: Insomnia, sleep

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